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Copyrights

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Professional Use

Are they necessary?

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Home                   Animals                   Desert Map                     Photography                What's New?

   Events     Weather     Writer's Cafe     City Profiles     Life in the Desert      Local Happenings

Mohave Green Rattlesnake
   The opinions here are solely those of in the desert. If you are a professional maybe you feel that you don't want others to be using your photos. This feeling may apply to a lot of people. But it's just too easy to crop or clone out a copyright. Size can also enter into the equation. If it's a small photo, say less than 640 pixels wide, then there is little chance that anyone could make a decent print from it.
   If you're posting photographs on Facebook there is always the ability to share or download your photo anyway. Many good photographers don't find it necessary to copyright their work. For the most part we've been very lax about using copyrights. And when we do use them, we try to make them blend into the scene. This is an important consideration as it sometimes takes away from the purpose of the photo. You should draw your viewer's eye to the intended object of the photo, not a copyright. It ruins the photo!  Also ask yourself this -- is my photo good enough to deserve a copyright? In almost all cases, when someone asks us to use one of our photos, the answer will be yes. We put them up here for identifications and locations of things in the desert. Here are some examples of of what a copyright will do to your photo.
Copyright examples

Mouse over / then click to see the 3 variations.

Copyright Example
   Here's an example of our copyright. It's very unobtrusive and hardly noticeable. The object being not to ruin the photo an yet to let others know we don't want it copied.
   There are often times when a copyright can have a dual purpose. Here's an example shared by Denny Thurston. You can visit his Facebook Page to see more of his unique work. Denny's photography and post processing skills are not just unique, they are amazing. He lights his subject (old vehicles) with a flashlight and takes numerous photos and then spends hours rendering the final result. His copyright only adds to his work!
Copyright Denny Thurston
   His copyright tells you this is a 1905 Curved Dash Oldsmobile. He often names his photos as shown here and they always seem appropriate - "Moonshadow". This does not take away from the photo and in fact enhances it.
   We've often seen people post photos that have problems, not sharp, no consideration for composition, and some cases just terrible photos. Yet, they had copyrights! This makes your photos look very unprofessional, to say the least. Please consider this as it only takes away from your photos and does not add to them. If you insist on adding them, then consider putting them down in the one of the lower corners of the photos, and never add them to the middle of the photo, and keep them small.
   Hopefully this will help with your use of copyrights on your photographs. And don't forget, size matters. Keep the photos small if you don't want them printed by someone else. You cannot stop others from using them, only the honest people will consider your copyright and obey the law. Resolving a copyright issue is expensive and time consuming.
   More on copyrights can be found   HERE
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