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Flowers

Flowers
   In the late Winter or early Spring when we get a few nice rains (doesn't happen every year in the desert) then we're liable to get a great year for a beautiful bloom in the desert. This was one of those years -- pictured to the right. This was taken near the end of January 2005. We had rain on and off for several weeks, not steady but more than normal. Look a the green on the hills! The fowers in the desert when they are booming are beautiful!
Scorpion Weed
   This is Scorpion Weed and it grows all over in the desert and survives even the hottest days. It has a terrible odor that smells like bad body odor. If you step on it or run over it with your vehicle you'll know it! It has hairs on it that cause a skin rash.
Fiveneedle Pricklyleaf
   This yellow flower is a Fiveneedle Pricklyleaf and  they were growing with the Scorpion Weed. The colors in the desert when we have a good year are always amazing.
Coral Beans
   These are Coral Bean Flowers. They seem to like to grown in and near washes. They have highly toxic red beans. Flowers appear before the plant leafs out.
Sand Verbena
   These grow in carpets in the desert.These are very prolific plants if it rains a little several times close together. They grow low - 6 to 8 inches high.
African Daisey
   This lonely flower was growing out in the desert in a flat area. It is the Glandular Cape Marigold. Or African Daisey. What a beautiful flower to find out in the desert. These African plants are often found in wild flower mixes and have become naturalized here in the desert.
Arizona Lupin
   This is the Arizona Lupine. It grows in the desert at lower elevations and is one of the prettiest flowers. The fruit is a legume, slightly less than an inch long. It is common in open sandy washes in all of the desert southwest at lower elevations.
Brittle Bush
   This is a common bush / flower found in the lower desert all across the Southwest in the desert. This is the Brittle Bush. There are washes named Yellow Medicine because of the high number of Brittle Bushes found on the hills near the washes. The Native Americans called this plant Yellow Medicine, and it was used in their medicine potions and tea.
   This was found near Baker Tanks which is located just a little South and East of Wellton, Arizona. Interesting plant found in the desert near the pools of water in the tanks. It's leaves and stalks were covered with little stickers or needles.
Bristly Nama Sandbells
Miniture Wool Star
   This one is the Miniature Wool Star. Not a common flower, but it is found in Arizona in several places in rocky areas in the desert.
   This is the Desert Fairy Duster. Although not found as often as some of the other flowers in the desert. It is, as you can see, a beautiful specimen.
Desert Fairy Duster
Gordon Bladderpod
   This is the Gordon Bladderpod and it was found just North of the Bradshaw Trail. It was growing quite prolifically all along the washes going into the Red Cloud Mine, California.
Southwestern Pricklypoppy
   Found on the Bradshaw Trail it is quite common in that area. This is the Southwestern Pricklypoppy. The branches are full of prickly needles and the plants are about 2 ft. high.
Indian Paintbrush
   This is the Indian Paintbrush. It's a beautiful red flower found mostly in the high desert. You can't miss this one.
Desert Lily
   This is the Desert Lily. It was found in Baja, Mexico. They are also found in the Sonoran Desert in the Southwest. It's in the Agave family. And this flower has a bulb like an oinion, without the smell or taste.
   If you have any corrections or additions to our flowers section on the site -- your input would be greatly appreciated. You will be given credit for any information, or photos supplied to us that are used on the site.   E-mail  us.

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Plants

Scorpion Weed

Fiveneedle Pricklyleaf

Coral Beans

Sand Verbena

Glandular Cape Marigold
or
African Daisey

Arizona Lupine

Brittle Bush

Bristly Nama Sandbells

Miniture Wool Star

Desert Fairy Duster

Gordon Bladderpod

Southwestern
Pricklypoppy

Indian Paintbrush

Desert Lily

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Desert Five Spot
Ocotillo
Desert Christmas Tree
Pholisma arenarium
White Bear Poppy

(Pholisma arenarium)

Desert Christmas Tree

   These two photos were taken in the Yuha/Anza Borrego Desert over by Ocotillo. Martin Feldner ID'd this plant as a parasitic plant and not a mushroom or fungus. What a neat find. Rare plant with small purple flowers.

Photo courtesy of Patsy Lowe

   This is the Desert Five Spot and was found in the Yuha Desert, just east of Nomirage/Ocotillo. This year (2010) they are more abudant than normal. It holds itself in a cup form, later in the day when it is warmer it will unfold and expose it's five crimson spots.

Photo courtesy of Patsy Lowe

Photo courtesy of Patsy Lowe

Photo courtesy of Patsy Lowe

   Ocotillo blooms are very pretty in the desert. This one was photographed in Canyon Sin Nombre in the Anza Borrego Desert jsut north of the town of Ocotillo off of S2 in California. Most of it's blooms are not yet open.
   This is the White Bear Poppy. This one stands 3 1/2 ft. tall and has a multitude of buds. This photo was taken on 3/27/10 in Ocotillo in the Nomirage area

Ocotillo

Desert Five Spot

White Bear Poppy

Don't miss the Desert Bloom Pages

Home                   Animals                   Desert Map                     Photography                What's New?

   Events     Weather     Writer's Cafe     City Profiles     Life in the Desert      Local Happenings

Home                   Animals                   Desert Map                     Photography                What's New?

   Events     Weather     Writer's Cafe     City Profiles     Life in the Desert      Local Happenings

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Wild Flowers

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Page 3   of Flowers in the desert.

Desert Lavender

   Very pretty desert plant that can reach heights of 18 ft.  Also called "bushmints" because of the shape of it's leaves (mint like). Found in the desert southwest and usually blooms in early spring (March). Never found above 3,000 ft. elev.

(Hyptis emoryi)

Mojave Sage

Mojave Sage

(Salvia mohavensis)

   Mojave Sage is a species of sage native to the Mojave Desert. It is a low rounded shrub growing to about 3 ft. tall with small opposing evergreen leaves. The flowers are blue. Use the Magnifying glass to see a close-up of this beautiful desert flower.

Page 4   of Flowers in the desert.

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