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Flowers 5

   If you have any corrections or additions to our flowers section on the site -- your input would be greatly appreciated. You will be given credit for any information, or photos supplied to us that are used on the site.   E-mail  us.

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Home                   Animals                   Desert Map                     Photography                What's New?

   Events     Weather     Writer's Cafe     City Profiles     Life in the Desert      Local Happenings

Home                   Animals                   Desert Map                     Photography                What's New?

   Events     Weather     Writer's Cafe     City Profiles     Life in the Desert      Local Happenings

Southwest Flowers

Page 2   of Flowers in the desert.

Calfornia Poppy

(Eschscholzia californica)

   Feathery, highly-dissected, blue-green leaves clasp the 1-2 ft. stems of this popular, perennial wildflower. Showy, 1-3 in. wide, four-petaled flowers are open only on sunny days. The flowers are solitary and long-stalked and vary in color from orange to yellow. Each of the satiny petals has a deep-orange spot at its base.

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Page 3   of Flowers in the desert.

Page 4   of Flowers in the desert.

Photo Courtesy of R. Phillips

Photo Courtesy of Greg Watson

Photos Courtesy of Greg Watson

Photo above Courtesy of Greg Watson

Photo above Courtesy of Greg Watson

Desert Calico

(Loeseliastrum matthewsii)

   Small bristly tufts or mats with colorful white to pink or lavender-dotted, bilaterally symmetrical flowers nestled among leaves. This entire plant was less 1 inch tall.

Desert Candle

(Caulanthus inflatus)

   Desert candle is a flowering plant in the family Brassicaceae, native to the Mojave Desert of the southwestern United States, where it is found at elevations between 150 and 1,500 meters. It is an annual plant growing up to 70 centimeter in height, with a thick, swollen stem that looks like a yellow candle. The basal leaves are 2-7 centimeter long, smaller higher up the stem. The flowers are small, with four reddish-purple petals. This plant is in the "Mustard" family.

Desert Tomato

(Lycium andersonii)

   Its common names include water-jacket, redberry desert-thorn, Anderson thornbush, Anderson's desert thorn, Anderson boxthorn, Anderson lycium, Anderson wolfberry, and squawberry.
   This plant is a shrub growing up to about (8 ft 10 in) in maximum height. It grows from a large fibrous root system which can extend over (30 ft) from the base of the plant. The shrub is rounded in shape with many branches covered in many thin spines up to (0.79 in) long. The flat leaves are thick and fleshy, measuring up to 1.7 centimetres (0.67 in) long. Ripe berries are edible and tasty. Don't eat the berries if still green, they are toxic!

Gilia

(latiflora)

   Gilia is a genus of between 25 and 50 species of flowering plants in the family Polemoniaceae, native to temperate and tropical regions of the Americas, from the western United States south to northern Chile, where they occur mainly in desert or semi-desert habitats. Each Flower is about 1/4 inch in diameter

Photo Courtesy of Greg Watson

Gravel Ghosts

(Atrichoseris platyphylla)

    The chicory-like flowers of atrichoseris platyphylla, about 1.5 inches in diameter, have several rows of overlapping petals, yellow at the center, pinkish purple at the tips but otherwise pure white. The plant grows in sandy or gravelly locations in the Southwest deserts. This photo was taken in Furnace Creek, Death Valley.

Photo Courtesy of Greg Watson

Califonia Poppy
Desert Calico
Desert Candle
Desert Candle

Close-up--

Desert Tomato
Giant Panamint Daisy

Giant Panamint Daisy

(Enceliopsis covillei)

   This daisy is a rare species of flowering plant in the daisy family known by the common name Panamint daisy. It is endemic to Inyo County, California, where it is known only from the rocky slopes of the western Panamint Range. This is a perennial herb with erect stems varying in height from 15 centimeters to over a meter, growing from a tough, woody caudex. The silvery woolly leaves are up to 10 centimeters long by 8 wide and are spade-shaped to oval to diamond-shaped with winged petioles.
Gilia
Gravel Ghosts
Mariposa Lily

Mariposa Lily

(Calochortus kennedyi)

   Out of the 67 different species of mariposa lilies in the world, 45 of them are found in California, including twelve different species found throughout the Los Padres National Forest. They have simple or somewhat branched stems, (0.5 foot to 4 feet) tall.

Photo Courtesy of Greg Watson

Mojave Aster

Mojave Aster

(Xylorhiza tortifolia)

    It's a shrubby plant which can grow up to 30 inches high. The stems are gray-green and long. It has whitish-green to silverish-green, narrow, hairy leaves. They are about 3 inches long, and have small spike-like points on their edges. They are in the sunflower family.

Photo Courtesy of Greg Watson

Mojave Sun Cups

Mojave Sun Cups

(Camissonia campestris)

   Mojave sun cups is a slender-stemmed, erect and usually well-branched annual that as its name implies is often found in the Mojave Desert but is not confined to that area, also inhabiting cismontane grasslands and creosote bush scrub from Inyo Co. to interior San Diego Co. to an elevation of perhaps 3000'.

Photo Courtesy of Greg Watson

Phacelia

Phacelia

(tanacetifolia)

    As with many species in the Boraginaceae, contact with the hairs of some species of Phacelia can cause a very unpleasant rash similar to that from poison oak and poison ivy in sensitive individuals. The major contact allergen of Phacelia crenulata has been identified as geranylhydroquinone. The similar-appearing species Eriodictyon parryi (poodle-dog bush), a common chaparral plant of Southern California, is also a frequent cause of skin irritation.

Photo above Courtesy of Greg Watson

Page 5    You are here!

Desert Tomato

Photo above Courtesy of Patti Ziegler

   This is what the Desert Tomato looks like when it flowers before it bears fruit. It is a succulent. This plant was photographed on Buckskin Mt. In Arizona.
Brownplume Wirelettuce

Brownplume Wirelettuce

(Stephanomeria pauciflora)

   The Flower heads are 3/4 inch (1.9cm) wide and have toothed rays and pinkish purple stamens. The flowers are followed by seeds with tan, straw-like pappus bristles. The bases of the seed heads are persistent (don't fall off). Habitat: Desert, Upland Mountain (lower elevations). Found: Gold Butte National Monument, Nevada.

Photo Courtesy of Chuck Hoekman

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