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Frisco and Newhouse

Home                   Animals                   Desert Map                     Photography                What's New?

   Events     Weather     Writer's Cafe     City Profiles     Life in the Desert      Local Happenings

Home                   Animals                   Desert Map                     Photography                What's New?

   Events     Weather     Writer's Cafe     City Profiles     Life in the Desert      Local Happenings

Ghost Towns, Mines, Utah

Larry Schaibley Editor

Historical Information:

  
      Frisco developed as the post office and commercial center for the San Francisco mining District and was the terminus of the Utah Southern Railroad extension from Milford. The Horn Silver Mine was discovered in 1875. It's production along with the other mines in the area vary from 20 million to 60 million dollars. Whichever one you choose, that's still a lot of money for back in the early 1900's With 23 saloons the town got the reputation of the wildest town in the Great Basin. Drinking water had to be freighted in. Elevation 6,500 ft. Area is just 20 miles West of Milford, Utah on CRT. 21.

   It was on February 13, 1885 that the Horn Silver Mine completely caved in. It was 1,600 ft. deep at that time. Luckily it happened at night and no one was in the mine at the time so no one was injured. Today the Horn Silver Mine has new owners and they have over 9,000 acres of patented claims in the area so the old Horn Silver Mine is no longer accessible. The Decorative Rock Mine shown in the video is part of these claims. Unlike regular claims, patented claim owners do own the land and have the right to prosecute trespassers, so be warned.

   In the beginning of the video we went into the hills East of Frisco and found the Carbonate Mine (see the GPX track on a topo for more). We went past the Carbonate Mine and continued up the wash (which requires a 4WD to negotiate. Here we found 2 kilns with 2 rock squirrels. This area is full of roads and needs to be explored on a more thorough basis later on. I'm sure we missed a lot here. Power lines following the wash means there is still something further in that we didn't get to. Caution, this road is very rough and washed out.

   One other thing. The King David Mine is miss-located on the photos in the video. The one that is listed as the Kind David Mine is actually the 1,100 ft. deep Drum Shaft. Sorry about that.

Video slideshow - GPX track below --

Video Slideshow

   Newhouse is a fairly extensive site and should be looked into more closely than we did. An threatening storm caused us to leave the desert here before we could spend any more time exploring the many old buildings on the site.

Topography Map

Topography Map

Please enlarge this map for more detail

   There are a lot of mines and Ghost Towns in Utah as well as some of the most beautiful rock formations you'll find anywhere. If you like this kind of thing then this area would be a great place to start.
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