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Earthquake Faults

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Home                   Animals                   Desert Map                     Photography                What's New?

   Events     Weather     Writer's Cafe     City Profiles     Life in the Desert      Local Happenings

Faults

Larry Schaibley Editor
   Have you ever been in an earthquake in the desert? It's a scary situation to say the least. There are small quakes every day in the desert southwest, and every once in a while there is a big one. When you get to a 7 or above the real damage begins. Roads, buildings and water supplies are effected. If you've never been here when a big one occurred then we'll show you what to expect. See the video below.

7.2 Earthquake, April 4th. 2010

   A little more detail on this quake can be found in our Local Happenings Page

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   First is a location map from the earthquake web site with the exact location of the major part of the quake (large red box). Also notice all the after shocks shown in blue boxes. By April 8th. there was over 2,000 quakes on this map.

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   Some faults are also so small that people pass right by them and never see them. Here's a perfect example. While exploring for artifacts we found this small section of a large fault. Nathan is shown here for a size comparison.
   One of the larger earthquakes to hit the desert southwest happened on this day in April. This hit a large area and was felt as far east as Phoenix, Arizona and west to San Diego, California. The earthquake was centered  below Mexicali, Baja, Mexico. In Yuma it shook for over a minute and did some real damage. Nearer the center the earthquake it was more devastating. See the photos below. Here's a video that was shot in Yuma, Arizona. Notice the water in the pool.

Earthquake Photos

Eathquake fault, Nathan Winget
Earthquake Fault
   Just as a comparison, all faults do not appear the same. This one running through the desert might be mistaken for a slide. It is a prominent fault.
Earthquake Map
Earthquake in the mountains
   This looks like fog in the mountains, but it is the effect the quake had by shaking the mountains and causing large clouds of dust. This photo was taken just below Mexicali.
Fault line damage in a road.
Fault line in a road
   A major fault running across a road in Baja, Mexico. Many roads and homes were destroyed in this earthquake. Most of the most severe damage was in Baja. This fault line is part of the San Andreas Fault that runs up the coast of California and down through the center of the Seas of Cortez.
   Here the fault line is running in the same direction and location as the road. So what is it like to feel a quake like this? During the quake you could not stand up. It felt like the earth under your feet was moving back and forth covering a distance of 3 to 4 ft. And it's scary. This lasted longer than most do.
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