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Parowan Gap, Utah

Home                   Animals                   Desert Map                     Photography                What's New?

   Events     Weather     Writer's Cafe     City Profiles     Life in the Desert      Local Happenings

Home                   Animals                   Desert Map                     Photography                What's New?

   Events     Weather     Writer's Cafe     City Profiles     Life in the Desert      Local Happenings

Petroglyphs

   During early 1850 an exploration group led by David Fullmer camped at Parowan and explored the canyons surrounding the Valley of the Little Salt Lake in the desert, which is just east of Parowan Gap. The Parowan Gap petroglyphs were discovered by the Fullmer group. During his stay in the area Chief Walker, a Ute Indian, told them that Parowan Gap was "God's Own House". This archeological site was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1969. The petroglyphs here represent the work of the prehistoric Frement and Southern Piute cultures. Although the meanings are not known, they surely represent in some form, travel routes, sources of water, hunting areas, personal and tribal religious pursuits.
   Getting off of Interstate 15 at Exit # 62 and then going west toward Minersville on Rt. #130 you'll travel for 13 minutes (13.2 miles) to get to the turn off for Parowan Gap. There is a large sign indicating the turn. It is then only 2.4 miles to the Gap.  If your coming out of Cedar City then just follow Rt. 130 (Main Street) West and follow the GPS track after crossing Interstate 15.

History of the Parowan Gap and directions.

Photos of the Gap and the Petroglyphs.

Video, Slideshow

   There are literally hundreds of petroglyphs in Parowan Gap, some are probably a thousand years old. Some are well known, such at the Zipper Glyph. It does stand out! Here are a few of the better known ones at the gap in the mountains. Don't hesitate to look elsewhere in the mountains here. More info on the area below ---

Red Hills, Parowan Gap

BLM sign Utah Wildlife
Off roading in Utah
Juniper
Coyote Skull
Red Hills, Parowan Gap, Utah
Mineralization in Utah

Wikimapia Map

   Nesting raptors, the Utah Prairie Dog, Sage Grouse, Jack Rabbits and Rattlesnakes might want to make your aquaintance in this section of the high desert. There are also quite a few deer in the area. Eagels are a common sight as well as Ravens and Magpies.
   Off-roading here is a common practice and the back country in this region shouldn't be ignored if you have a 4x4 or ATV to explore some of the many roads that are open to the public. This time of the year (March) some of the roads may be inaccessible due to snow.
   Juniper trees, as shown here, abound. Also watch for Pinyon Pines, which are favorite nesting areas for the local birds.
   Keep your eyes open for other things you might run across, like this Coyote skull we found while walking in the wooded areas just north of the Parowan Gap.
   In the east end of the Gap there is another area that you might want to explore. There are several hiking trails up on the right side of this mountain. This may be why the mountains here are called the Red Hills.
   Molten quartz and other colorful formations we found at the base of the mountain pictured above. You could spend a lot of time in this area. There is a great deal of mineralization here. If you'd like to see examples of this then stop at the local BLM Office on 176 DL Sargent Drive just off of Rt. 130, (Main St.) 435-586-2401

An interactive Widimapia Map of the area.

   What makes this area so nice is that it is available to anyone even if you don't have a 4 wheel drive vehicle. The main petroglyphs are within easy walking distance of the parking area at the Gap.                Have fun -----

Dinosaur Tracks, more   Page 2

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