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Snakes 2

Venomous Snakes 2

Photo courtesy of Martin Feldner

Information on this page, verified by Martin Feldner, Herpetologist.

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Back to    Page 1  Venomous Snakes

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(Crotalus viridis)

Hopi Rattlesnake

Red Diamond Rattlesnake

(Crotalus ruber)

Southwestern Speckled Rattlesnake

(Crotalus pyrrhus)

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Panamint Rattlesnake

(Crotalus stephensi)

Grand Canyon Rattlesnake

Grand Canyon
Rattlesnake

(Crotalus abyssus)

   Yvonne found and photographed this rattlesnake in Peep-a-Boo Canyon in Escalante, Southeast Utah. See the note below from Martin Feldner about this ID.
This is an unusual find.
Length -- 16 to 54 inches long.

Photo courtesy of Yvonne Baur

    NOTE: about this snake ID. This snake photo doesn't represent typical Grand Canyon rattlesnake phenotypes and that region needs added investigations to better understand the dynamics leading to the results so far obtained. For additional information on this topic I have included the citation of the paper in which this information was first published and the book in which it appeared. The below paper was the first time Grand Canyon rattlesnakes were documented outside the confines of the Grand Canyon and immediate vicinity of the canyon rim.
Below are the references referred to above.
References
Douglas, M.E., M.R. Douglas, G.W. Schuett, L.W. Porras, and A.T. Holycross. 2002. Phylogeography of the western rattlesnake (Crotalus viridis complex), with emphasis on the Colorado Plateau. In Biology of the Vipers. Edited by G.W. Schuett, M. Höggren, M.E. Douglas, and H.W. Greene. Eagle Mountain Publishing, Eagle Mountain, Utah. pp. 11-50
Schuett, G.W., M. Höggren , M.E. Douglas, H.W. Greene. 2002. Biology of the Vipers. Eagle Mountain Publishing, LC. 580 pp.

Martin Feldner, Herpetologist,
Page Editor.

Arizona Black Rattlesnake
Arizona Black Rattlesnake
Hopi Rattlesnake

Arizona Black Rattlesnake

(Crotalus cerberus)

Photo courtesy of Martin Feldner

Photo courtesy of Bryan D. Hughes

   This Rattlesnake is the same species as the Prairie Rattlesnake, different name, same species, only known to be found in the Hopi Reservation and surrounding areas.. Prairie Rattlesnake is listed on Page 1. Photographed in Coconino County, Arizona

Photo courtesy of Bryan D. Hughes

   Extreme close-up of his head and tail. Photographed in Pima County, Arizona.
Red Diamond Rattlesnake

Photo courtesy of Bryan D. Hughes

Southwestern Speckled Rattlesnake

Photo courtesy of Bryan D. Hughes

Banded Rock Rattlesnake

Banded Rock Rattlesnake

(Crotalus lepidus klauberi)

   This snake is found in higher elevations mountain ranges until entering the Chihuahua Desert where it does inhabit the desert.  
Photographed in Cochise County, Arizona

Photo courtesy of Bryan D. Hughes

Panamint Rattlesnake
Tiger Rattlesnake

Photo courtesy of Martin Feldner

Tiger Rattlesnake

(Crotalus tigris)

   The Arizona Black Rattlesnake is a higher elevation mountain species that rarely penetrates the desert.

On to   Page 3  Non-venomous Snakes

   Due to modern science, scientific names of these species, and sub-species, of reptiles may change. Scientific names have already changed in some instances.. Modern DNA testing gives the experts a better way to identify these reptiles, and to know which group they belong to.
   This snake is found across the central mts. of Arizona from below the Colorado River though the White Mts. down to the Pinaleno, Galiuro, Santa Catalina and Rincons at elevations from 4,000' to over 9,000'.
   A medium to large snake, up to 42 inches in length (excluding rattle). Some adults appear sold black with thin white, yellow, or orange crossbars on the back.
   Very large with lengths to a little over 5 ft. but most are the 2 1/2 to 3 1/2 ft. range. Found from Southern Ca. to Cabo San Lucas, Baja California Sur. Avoids elev. over 5,000 ft. Range includes some gulf islands. Photographed in San Diego County, Ca.
   A large rattlesnake up to 51 inches with extremely variable coloration, most being a rusty tan or dull pinkish-brown. Found in the southwestern part of Arizona at elev. up to 5,000 ft. Photographed in Yuma County, Arizona.
   Sizes range up to 35 inches in total length, excluding rattle. Base coloration is variable, even within the same local populations. This is a highly venomous pit viper that is found in the southwestern US and northwestern Mexico. It has a lack of black rings on the tail. Found at elev. from 1,000 to 5,000 ft. Mates, July and August with a liter of up to 6 young.
   Maximum length is 52 inches, average is 24 to 36 inches. A resident of the Mojave Desert from the Mojave River northward along the eastern slopes of the Sierra Nevada Mts. Also found in Death Valley and in the Panamint Mt. range. Highly variable coloration from area to area.

Visit Bryan D. Hughes web site HERE

Visit Bryan D. Hughes web site HERE

Visit Bryan D. Hughes web site HERE

Visit Bryan D. Hughes web site HERE

Visit Bryan D. Hughes web site HERE

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